Venue & Hospitality

Conference Dates: May 20-21, 2022

Hotel Services & Amenities

  • Audio/Visual Equipment Rental.
  • Business Center.
  • Business Phone Service.
  • Complimentary Printing Service.
  • Express Mail.
  • Fax.
  • Meeting Rooms.
  • Office Rental.
  • Photo Copying Service.
  • Secretarial Service.
  • Telex.
  • Typewriter.
  • Video Conference.
  • Video Messaging.
  • Video Phone.
  • ATM.
  • Baggage Storage.

Transportation

About City

London has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium. Known colloquially as the Square Mile, it retains boundaries that closely follow its medieval limits. The adjacent City of Westminster has for centuries housed the national government. London has 31 additional boroughs north and south of the river. The London region is governed by the mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Big Ben and Parliament

Nothing screams "London" more emphatically than the 318-foot tower housing the giant clock and its resounding bell known as Big Ben. It's as iconic a landmark as Tower Bridge, and the tolling of Big Ben is known throughout the world as the time signal of the BBC. Below it, stretching along the Thames, are the Houses of Parliament, seat of Britain's government for many centuries and once the site of the royal Westminster Palace occupied by William the Conqueror.

St Paul's Cathedral

The largest and most famous of London's many churches - and undoubtedly one of the most spectacular cathedral's in the world - St. Paul's Cathedral sits atop the site of a Roman temple. The previous church structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, and Sir Christopher Wren designed the rebuild. Today, the twin Baroque towers and magnificent 365-foot dome of St. Paul's are a masterpiece of English architecture. If you're up to it, be sure to walk the stairs with their spectacular views of the dome's interior, including the Whispering Gallery — undoubtedly one of the top things to do in London.

Covent Garden

The market halls of Covent Garden are only the beginning of the neighborhood, which encompasses the shops and restaurants of Long Acre and other adjacent streets, those of Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, as well as the Central Square with its street performers. The halls and arcades of Covent Garden Market are lined with specialty shops and kiosks selling everything from fine handcrafts to tacky souvenirs.

The London Eye

Built to mark London's millennium celebrations in 2000, the London Eye (officially the Coca-Cola London Eye) is Europe's largest observation wheel. Its individual glass capsules offer the most spectacular views of the city as you embark on a circular tour rising 443 feet above the Thames. The journey lasts close to 30 minutes, often quicker than the time spent lining up for your turn. If you can, reserve your time in advance.

Hampton Court Palace

Another great Thames-side attraction, Hampton Court is one of Europe's most famous palaces. Its Great Hall dates from Henry VIII's time (two of his six wives supposedly haunt the palace), and it's where Elizabeth I learned of the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

Greenwich and Docklands

Greenwich is best known to tourists as the home of the Cutty Sark, the last of the 19th-century tea clippers to sail between Britain and China. The ship is located adjacent to the Discover Greenwich Visitor Centre with its exhibits showcasing more than 500 years of maritime history, and the Palladian mansion known as Queen's House.

Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens — officially called the Royal Botanic Gardens — is situated in southwest London on the south bank of the Thames and is a wonderful place to visit as you enjoy the numerous plants grown amid its 300 acres. Laid out in 1759, the gardens became government property in 1841. In 1897, Queen Victoria added Queen's Cottage and the adjoining woodland.

 

Attractions & Landmarks

    Attractions & Lanadmarks are Updating Soon...

City Highlights